Innovations in International Environmental Policy

Scientific understanding about the impact of human activity on the environment has increased significantly in recent years.

Science can help societies and policymakers to understand the nature of the problems we face, but determining how we ought to respond to the challenges of unsustainable development and environmental degradation is a deeply political process.

There is no single perspective on how we ought to respond; instead, there are a range of perspectives based on different values, principles, and worldviews.

Harnessing this diversity can help political institutions design policies that are more fair and effective. Yet there are many factors that can inhibit the inclusion of diverse voices in debate and policy-making.

 

Project approach:

This project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and led by Hayley Stevenson, involves analysing processes of institutional learning in the design of new environmental policies in international organisations.

It is particularly concerned with developing a better understanding of the relationship between ‘epistemic diversity’ and ‘institutional learning’, as well as of the challenges and opportunities for enhancing diversity and inclusion in international policy design.

More projects: Participatory Arts and Active Citizenship

Determining how we ought to respond to the challenges of unsustainable development and environmental degradation is a deeply political process

Related research streams

See more on our research stream: media, science and technological change.